sexyloops fly tying school part 15 - real daddy

sexyloops fly tying school part 15 - real daddy

t.z. | Friday, 29 January 2016

Crane Fly a.k.a. Daddy Longleg is a two winged insect which is found all over the world.

It looks a bit like a mosquito, on steroids. A slender body and thin, long legs and two wings. The wingspan varies from 1 to 5 or even 6 cm.

It´s a good fish catcher and fished as a dry fly. Tying is fun and one generally receives very good comments as this easy pattern looks very much like the real «thing».

Crane Fly a.k.a. Daddy Longleg is a two winged insect which is found all over the world.
It looks a bit like a mosquito, on steroids. A slender body and thin, long legs and two wings. The wingspan varies from 1 to 5 or even 6 cm.

It´s a good fish catcher and fished as a dry fly. Tying is fun and one generally receives very good comments as this easy pattern looks very much like the real «thing».

 
Tipulidae_crane_fly_mating
… here´s a little bit from Wikipedia on crane flies (Tipulidae) ….BiologyThe adult female usually contains mature eggs as she emerges from her pupa, and often mates immediately if a male is available (we like that bit). Males also search for females by walking or flying. Copulation takes a few minutes to hours and may be accomplished in flight. Adults have a lifespan of 10 to 15 days. The female immediately oviposits, usually in wet soil or mats of algae. Some lay eggs on the surface of a water body or in dry soils, and some reportedly simply drop them in flight. Most crane fly eggs are black in color. They often have a filament, which may help anchor the egg in wet or aquatic environments.Crane fly larvae (leatherjackets) have been observed in many habitat types on dry land and in water, including marine, brackish, and freshwater. They are cylindrical in shape, but taper toward the front end, and the head capsule is often retracted into the thorax. The abdomen may be smooth, lined with hairs, or studded with projections or welt-like spots. Projections may occur around the spiracles. Larvae may eat algae, microflora, and living or decomposing plant matter, including wood. Some are predatory.

What it doesn´t say on Wikipedia is that these insects make some people (to not say girls) scream. Konstanse still shivers – even after she´s tied one herself. The shape must trigger some very basic instincts. Trout do react different – they don´t scream, they just want to eat that thing.

OK – so that insect would fall under the category “terrestrial” in my simplyfied, entomolgy for “kids” kind of book. This means they get blown onto the water, sort of “un-voluntarely”. So it is ok when the fly looks a bit crashed. It does not need to have the legs excactly placed and spaced like a healthy and unharmed specimen. Far from it. Nor does it need very pretty wings. I skip this bit. These plastic wings one often sees make the fly rotate in the air. (bad, really really bad) – A twisted tippet brakes much quicker, plus it is much more visible. So here is my “Real Daddy”, which looks like the real thing – after been hit by a truck.


Daddy Longleg … a.k.a. – the Real Daddy

Materials needed

Hook: Partridge CZ or CZF size 14
Thread: Dyneema
Body: Polychenille

Legs: Pheasant tail fibres knotted once or twice.
You can either buy them ready or knot them yourself with a knitting needle.

… legs are important, remember.

Tyings steps