Archive for March, 2014

The steep hill.

March 21st, 2014 4 comments

The hut was at the bottom of a very steep hill. I drove down without incident on the dry mud track while thinking that if this gets wet, there’ll be no way in hell I’ll get back up!

After a tough but superb day’s fishing in a steep gorge it was a pleasure to get back to the comfort of the hut. Our legs were tired after a 300m climb, followed by a 300m decent, followed by a 100m climb, all part of the 2hr walk out. After some reheated home cooking and a few well deserved beers the bed beckoned. I was awoken before 5am by heavy rain belting off the tin roof… I thought for a moment.. Will it pass?? Should we get up and get out?? All I could think of was slipping back down the steep slope in the truck. I hate being stranded, even in an amazing place like this, I need to know that I can get out. I figured that if the rain continues we will be stuck here so I woke Robbie form his deep sleep and we quickly packed our stuff into the truck. The track was damp. Any more rain would have made things difficult but the old Terrano crawled up the hill in low box. By this time the rain had almost stopped. I drove through the darkness for a few ks to a spot which would be less affected by rain. This put us right on the water for day 2… after another couple of hours kip in the truck.


The read strike…

March 7th, 2014 No comments

I could see 2 fish in the pool. I walked slowly up river while I considered my approach. As always, I didn’t wait and think for too long. It’s important to take the shot as soon as it presents itself but without being rash. I sent in a shot, landing the single weighted nymph ahead of and to the right of the fish. I had no indicator. The fish swung to the right and I struck firmly when he was in the right place. I had no visual other than the fishes mannerisms. I was too far away to see his mouth. When a fish cruises to take your fly, his manner will change after he has eaten it. He will turn, slow down, or change direction in some way. If you wait to see which one of these he does, it will probably be too late! Timing this strike is something I have learned from exceptionally close quarter fishing to lake edge cruisers when both fish and fly (usually a spider or nymph) are visible. To elaborate on one example, When a fish slows down after he has taken your fly his tail will stop moving from side to side. Sounds obvious, but the fish’s speed wont change for a moment or two after the tail stops and by this time it will be too late to strike. Strike when his tail stops! In the end, its down to knowing your fish and where the fly is. Don’t hesitate…. or do!